exhibitions

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 Contemporary Art Center – Solvay, Cracow

I’ll think about that tomorrow.
By the expulsion of Adam and Eve from the Garden of Eden, the God from the Bible made the couple face miserable fate. Adam was charged with the infinity of work while Eve was to suffer the pain of childbirth and stay under her husband’s domination. In various classical approaches to the story both of them are deeply distressed at being forced to leave the Garden, with the example being a famous fresco by Masaccio. It is the fresco which became the source of inspiration for the diptych by Patryk Hadas. However, on the diptych it is Adam who grieves over what is just happening. Eve, depicted in a seductive contrapposto with her finger gently touching her lips, could be attributed with the famous phrase by Scarlet O’Hara from Gone with the Wind: ‘I can’t think about that right now. I’ll go crazy if I do. I’ll think about it tomorrow’. By expressing his voice the artist joined the present discourse on gender stereotypes. He did it incidentally, just by the way. Just as we sometimes happen to speak between the lines, Patryk speaks to us by different prints and, even more interestingly, somehow between them. He deconstructs the reality he faces and, subsequently, chooses between its elements, takes some of them and pieces them together again. He puts them in striking and sometimes bizarre contexts and then, astonished just like a little boy would be,  observes the outcome. His method reminds us of Dada artists who were not particularly concerned with what they wanted to express but what they incidentally happened to express. The exhibition shows what Patryk happened to express about the woman whom he observes from every angle, whom he is passionate about and whom he adores, what he sometimes does tongue in cheek as in the case of the nude drawings which is in fact a photo session (‘Paparazzi’). In the case of ‘Rhinoceros’ the joke is almost absurd, as we cannot be entirely sure whether the girl is as naive as to perceive a deer as a rhino or whether she is so mesmerised at the sight of ‘her deer’ that she sees something else in him. In his apotheosis of the woman, the artist does not deprecate her worse position as opposed to the man.‘Woman in the Kitchen’ (‘Kobieta w kuchni’) is a lady with no extraordinary features to help her deal with loads of housework; instead she is accompanied by men willing to help her. ‘Woman at Home’ (‘Kobieta w domu’) makes there be light. In ‘Everyday Dilemmas’ an iron and an ironing-board are attributes of womanhood, not a metaphor of household chores. The subjectivity of Eve in ‘The Expulsion’ (‘Wygnanie’) where she does not passively accept God’s will but rather maintains her own right to decide about herself is probably the essence of Patryk’s attitude towards women. Still a student of the Academy of Fine Arts in Cracow, he experiments with form and colour. Hadas draws heavily on the twentieth century ‘-isms’, pop-art, ad art and street art. He does not play-act, he does not dare to fix nor heal the world, he deals with problems he knows. He does not rebel against reality, he just questions it. He simply looks for the answers.

 

curator:

Robert Kardziś

 

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